The Top 10 Reasons Your Dieffenbachia Has Yellow Leaves

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If your dieffenbachia has yellow leaves, it’s important to determine the cause of the problem so you can take corrective action. In this blog post, we will discuss the top 10 reasons why your dieffenbachia may be losing its green color. We will also provide tips on how to correct each problem. So if your dieffenbachia is looking a little bit sickly, read on for some helpful advice!

Lots of water

Lots of water
Photo from @mrs_gloriosum

Watering is one of the basic requirements for a healthy diffenbahia. However, too much water can cause problems for your plant. If your diffenbahia’s leaves are yellowing, it could be a sign that you are overwatering it. When you water the plant, make sure the soil is completely dry before you water it again. Remember that damp soil with a lot of standing water will drown the roots and suffocate the plant, which will reduce the oxygen supply to the stem and therefore to the leaves. Overwatering leads to a disease called generalized, progressive yellowing.

Incorrect watering

Another problem with watering is the wrong approach. The plant should be watered deeply and less frequently than often and sparingly. The most important mistake in caring for a flower is to water in a hurry. Water the plant well and deeply, so that the water goes to the roots and starts pouring out of the drainage hole of the pot. Then the water will sufficiently soak the roots and they will supply life-giving moisture to the leaves, keeping them a rich green color. So if you notice that your soil is dry, try to water in moderation to correct the problem. Therefore, do not remove yellow leaves for a month because they will be able to get their beautiful green color back.

Old Age

Old Age
Photo from @vertbobo

With proper care, diffenbahia plants can live for a very long time – up to 10 years or more. As the plant ages, its leaves begin to turn yellow and brown as part of its growth cycle. If your diffenbahia is otherwise healthy, there is no need to worry about this color change. It is acceptable to leave the yellow leaves as they are and wait for them to fall off. After the leaves have fallen, you can trim the stems, thereby encouraging new growth.

Repositioning the plant

If the plant has been in one place for more than a few months, moving it to another room or room can stress the plant and its leaves will start to turn yellow. This is because the other room may have different humidity, temperature and lighting. It needs time to get used to the new environment.

Temperature

Temperature
Photo from @heyheysundays

If the temperature falls below 50 degrees Fahringey or rises above 80 degrees, dieffenbachia will begin to experience stress, which will manifest itself in yellowing of the leaves. Do not allow sudden changes in temperature, sudden cold spells, drafts, and do not place the plant under ventilation, air conditioners, or near heaters.

Lighting problems

Lighting problems
Photo from @aurora.lilacina

If your diffenbahia’s leaves are starting to turn yellow, it’s probably not getting enough light. Diffenbachia prefers bright, indirect sunlight. If you notice that the leaves are pointing toward the light source, it means that the plant is not getting enough light. Move the plant to a brighter location, but make sure the sun’s rays don’t burn it. The plant needs about 1-2 hours of direct sunlight a day and no more than that, otherwise it will burn the leaves. It is best to put dieffenbachia on a window sill and put special glass to diffuse the sunlight. This will give you the security of knowing that you are safe for your plant.

Spider mites

One of the most common causes of yellowing diffenbahia leaves is spider mites. These tiny pests are hard to see with the naked eye, but they can do a lot of damage to your plant. Spider mites suck the sap from the leaves, causing them to turn yellow and eventually die. Spider mites can be detected by the thin cobwebs they leave behind among the leaves. You can get rid of spider mites by using rubbing alcohol on the leaves and stem of your plant. Also help spraying with garlic water, where you need 2 heads of garlic pour 1 liter of boiling water. Let stand for 2 hours and spray the plant for 1-2 weeks. Soap solution is also considered to be effective.

Mealybugs

Mealybugs
Photo from @lr_plantasyflores

Mealybugs are small, white, fluffy pests that live on the stems and leaves of plants. They suck the sap from the plant, causing the leaves to turn yellow and eventually die. Mealybugs can be controlled by using a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. Wipe all visible mealybugs and eggs.

Infection

If the diffenbahia leaves turn yellow and the plant wilts, this could be a sign of infection. The most common cause of infection in diffenbahias is root rot caused by overwatering. If you think your plant may be infected, take it to a nursery or garden center for diagnosis. Root rot can be determined by the roots by digging up the plant and gently pulling it out to look at the roots. If they are partially damaged, you can carefully cut off the damaged roots and repot the plant in new soil.

Infertile soil

Infertile soil
Photo from @ifioridelcactus

One of the most common causes of yellowing leaves on a diffenbahia is poor soil. If your plant’s leaves are beginning to turn yellow, it could be that the soil is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus, which are very important in the proper and healthy development of the plant. The soil may be of poor quality to begin with, or it may not have been changed for a long time and is simply exhausted. If you suspect it’s the soil, then it’s worth doing a test to find out what’s missing.

When the problem with the soil is confirmed, you should fertilize it with nitrogen and phosphorus-rich fertilizer and other nutrients specifically for dieffenbachia. You can change the soil completely if you haven’t changed it in a while. It is recommended that the plant be fertilized, every 2-3 weeks throughout the growing season in which it requires more nutrients than usual.

Infertile soil
Photo from @1kahve1hadis
Nicolas Wayne

Gardening and lawn care enthusiast

Nicolaslawn
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